Education

Discover dynamic education programs and curriculum resources about the history of our city, state, and nation.

Education Mission

The New-York Historical Society Education Division provides dynamic programming and curriculum resources for students and teachers in New York and beyond. Historical study sparks curiosity and creativity, promotes cultural understanding, and fosters an empowered citizenry to strengthen our democracy. Our staff of passionate professionals draws on our world-renowned collections to engage learners of all ages in the study of our collective past.

 

Education programs made possible through endowments established by:
National Endowment for the Humanities
The Hearst Foundations
The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation

Public funding provided by:
Institute for Museum and Library Services
New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council
New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature

Important support provided by:
Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation
Carnegie Corporation of New York
Ford Foundation
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Altman Foundation
Deutsche Bank
The Pinkerton Foundation
Barker Welfare Foundation
The Keith Haring Foundation
The Bay and Paul Foundations
The Alice Lawrence Foundation
The Henry Nias Foundation
Fred and Joan Pittman
Anonymous

 

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Catherine Allgor is a distinguished fellow at the University of California, Riverside, where she teaches classes on early America, politics, and the history of women's lives and gender. She is also director of education at the Huntington Library. Professor Allgor has written for national publications and has received numerous awards and recognition for her work. Where to find her: American Revolution Consequences Panel—Women's New Civic Role: Securing the Revolution in the Next Generation, Friday, July 21, 12:30–2:30 pm

D'Ann Campbell is a professor of history and Director of the Academic Support Center at Culver-Stockton College, and for the 2016–17 academic year, she is serving as distinguished professor of history at the U.S. Air Force Academy.  She was the first woman —civilian or military—to teach military history at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and is the author of Women at War with America: Private Lives in a Patriotic Era. Where to find her: Unexpected Challenges to Gender Roles, 1898-1941, Monday, July 31, 9:30–11:30 am

William Chafe is the Alice Mary Baldwin Professor Emeritus of History at Duke University. Chafe co-founded the Duke Oral History Program and the Duke Center for the Study of Civil Rights and Race Relations. He also helped create the Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women and is one of the founders of the Center for Documentary Studies. He has authored 13 books and has received numerous awards for his work. Where to find him: WWII Consequences Panel—Beyond Rosie the Riveter: American Women in the Post-War World (panel discussion), Friday, August 4, 9:30–11:30 am

Catherine Clinton is the Denman Endowed Professor in American History at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She is the author or editor of 25 books, including The Other Civil War: American Women in the Nineteenth Century and Tara Revisited: Women, War, & the Plantation Legend. Where to find her: Battle Scars: Gender and Sexuality in the American Civil War, Thursday, July 27, 9:30-11:30 am, and Civil War Consequences Panel—Reconstruction and the Lost Cause: American Women and the Aftermath of the Civil War, Friday, July 28, 12:30–2:30 pm

Julie Des Jardins is a professor of history specializing in the history of American gender at Baruch College. She has written several books, including Women and the Historical Enterprise in America: Gender, Race, and the Politics of Memory. Where to find her: WWII Consequences Panel—Beyond Rosie the Riveter: American Women in the Post-War World, Friday, August 4, 9:30–11:30 am

 

Doug Egerton is a professor of early American and 19th-century U.S. history at Le Moyne College. He has written many book and publications, including Thunder At the Gates: The Black Civil War Regiments That Redeemed America. Where to find him: Women and Wives of the Fifty-Fourth, Wednesday, July 26, 12:30–2:30 pm, and Civil War Consequences Panel—Reconstruction and the Lost Cause: American Women and the Aftermath of the Civil War, Friday, July 28, 12:30–2:30 pm

Liette Gidlow is an associate professor in the history department at Wayne State University. She is a specialist in 20th-century politics, women's history, and mass culture, and she has published two books: The Big Vote and Obama, Clinton, Palin. Where to find her: Hastening the Homecoming: Women as Workers, Consumers, and Homemakers, Monday, July 31, 12:30–2:30 pm

 

Martha Hodes is a professor of history at NYU specializing in the 19th-century American history, race, Civil War and Reconstruction, gender, and the craft of historical writing. She has written several books, including The Sea Captain’s Wife: A True Story of Love, Race, and War in the Nineteenth Century, which was a finalist for the Lincoln Book Prize. Where to find her: Civil War Consequences Panel—Reconstruction and the Lost Cause: American Women and the Aftermath of the Civil War, Friday, July 28, 12:30–2:30 pm

Woody Holton is the McCausland Professor of History at the University of South Carolina. He has written several books dealing with early American history, especially the American Revolution, with a focus on economic history and on African Americans, Native Americans, and women. Where to find him: American Revolution Consequences Panel—Women's New Civic Role: Securing the Revolution in the Next Generation, Friday, July 21, 12:30–2:30 pm

Maureen Honey is a professor of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her books include Creating Rosie the Riveter: Class, Gender, and Propaganda During World War II and Bitter Fruit: African American Women in World War II. Where to find her: Propaganda and Popular Culture II: Images of African American and White Women in World War II, Wednesday, August 2, 12:30–2:30 pm, and WWII Consequences Panel—Beyond Rosie the Riveter: American Women in the Post-War World, Friday, August 4, 9:30–11:30 pm

Tera Hunter is a professor in the History Department and the Center for African-American Studies at Princeton University. Her first book, which received several awards, To ‘Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors After the Civil War, focuses on the experiences of working-class women in southern cities from Reconstruction through the 1920s. Where to find her: Enslaved and Freed Women in the Civil War, Wednesday, July 29, 9:30– 11:30 am

Cynthia Kierner is a professor and the Director of the PhD Program at George Mason University. She has authored or edited seven books and numerous articles and is an Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer and past president of the Southern Association for Women Historians. Where to find her: Race, Gender, and Power in Early America, Monday, July 17, 12:30–2:30 pm

 

Cindy Lobel is a professor at Lehman College specializing in the history of urban development, consumer culture, food history, and American women's history. She is the author of Urban Appetites: Food and Culture in Nineteenth-Century New York, and has written for multiple publications. Where to find her: Walking Tour of Civil War New York, Tuesday, July 25, 9:30–11:30 am

 

Sarah Lohman is the author of the historic gastronomy blog Four Pounds Flour and the book Eight Flavors: The Untold Story of American Cuisine. In addition to her writing, Lohman works with institutions around the country to create public programs focused on food, historic recipes, and the history of American Cuisine. Where to find her: WWII Cooking Class (optional evening field trip), Wednesday, August 2, 3:15–4:45 pm

Holly Mayer is an associate professor of history at Duquesne University. She is the author of several books and articles on late 18th century America with a particular focus on the American Revolution, civil-military relations, and the evolution of American character and culture. Where to find her: War Experiences: Women Combatants, Camp Followers, and Defenders of the Home Front, Tuesday, July 18, 12:30–2:30 pm

Stephanie McCurry is the R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History in Honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower at Columbia University. She is the author of many books and scholarly articles on the subjects of the US in the 19th century, the American South, the American Civil War, and the history of women and gender. Where to find her: Confederate Women: The 1863 Bread Riot, Tuesday, July 25, 1–3 pm

Leisa Meyer is a professor of American studies and history at the College of William & Mary. She is an editor for the journal Feminist Studies and is the author of Creating G.I. Jane: Sexuality and Power in the Women's Army Corps during World War II. Where to find her: Erasures: Some Reflections on Gender/Women, The Military, and War – The World War II Example, Tuesday, August 1, 1–3 pm

 

Jennifer Morgan is a Professor of History and Chair of Social and Cultural Analysis at NYU. She is the author of Laboring Women: Gender and Reproduction in New World Slavery, and a number of articles on the topics of early African American history, comparative slavery, histories of racial ideology, and women and gender. Where to find her: Free and Enslaved Women in the Revolution and Early Republic, Wednesday, July 19, 12:30–2:30 pm

Mary Beth Norton is the Mary Donlon Alger Professor of American History at Cornell University. She has written and edited countless books and articles, including Founding Mothers and Fathers, which was a finalist for the 1997 Pulitzer Prize. Norton has served in leading roles for the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians and the American Historical Association. Where to find her: American Revolution Consequences Panel—Women's New Civic Role: Securing the Revolution in the Next Generation, Friday, July 21, 12:30–2:30 pm

Nina Silber is a professor of history at Boston University. She is the author of several books, including Divided Houses: Gender and the Civil War and Daughters of the Union: Northern Women Fight the Civil War. Where to find her: American Women and the Memory of the Civil War, Friday, July 28, 9:30–11:30 pm

 

Sheila Skemp is the Clare Leslie Marquette Professor of American History at the University of Mississippi. She has written numerous books on colonial and revolutionary America and women and gender and was designated an Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer for the academic years 2010-2013. Where to find her: The Impact of the Revolution on Gender Ideology, Thursday, July 20, 9:30–11:30 am

Barbara Winslow is a professor in the School of Education and the Women's and Gender Studies Program at Brooklyn College. In 2006 she founded the Shirley Chisholm Center for Research on Women, a feminist think tank honoring the memory of the trailblazing activist and politician, and organizes the Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women's Activism Content. Where to find her: War and the Political Mobilization of American Women, Thursday, August 3, 9:30–11:30 am

Elizabeth Wollman is an associate professor of music at Baruch College, CUNY.  She has published articles and written books on the relationship between gender stereotypes and rock radio programming, the socioeconomic development of the Broadway musical in the 1980s and 1990s, the reception of rock musicals, and the Off-Broadway “adult” musical in 1970s New York City. Where to find her: Hamilton and Women in the Fight (optional evening workshop), Tuesday, July 18, 3:15–4:45 pm

“Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.”

Creative: Tronvig Group